The Latest

Sep 20, 2014 / 687 notes
pretty-motherfxckerr:



First day at school, Gaza, Palestine.

this is the most important thing right now.


"عدنا الى مدرستنا رغم الدمار" "We went back to school despite the destruction" writes the teacher on the board
Sep 20, 2014 / 110,971 notes

pretty-motherfxckerr:

First day at school, Gaza, Palestine.

this is the most important thing right now.

"عدنا الى مدرستنا رغم الدمار"
"We went back to school despite the destruction"
writes the teacher on the board

(via mysoulhasgrowndeep-liketherivers)

Sep 20, 2014 / 280,821 notes

majiinboo:

  • Do not forget Michael Brown
  • Do not forget how the media dehumanized him and tried to justify his murder
  • Do not forget how peaceful protests were painted as savage riots
  • Do not forget police armed with military grade weapons terrorized and arrested black civilians
  • Do not forget Darren Wilson being awarded over $200,000 in fundraiser donations for murdering an unarmed black child
  • Do not forget that this system was not built to defend us, but to control us
  • Do not forget Ferguson 

(via mysoulhasgrowndeep-liketherivers)

janet22d:

With my lovely mum #birthdayflow #yoruba #naijaladies
Sep 20, 2014 / 377 notes

janet22d:

With my lovely mum #birthdayflow #yoruba #naijaladies

(via mysoulhasgrowndeep-liketherivers)

celiajoydarling:

There is one thing that truly fills me with rage; when people refer to Amy Winehouse as “a train wreck”, “A bad role model” or worse “just a junkie”.
Yes, she was eccentric, she was bold, she used drugs, she was open about her eating disorders and her behavior was boozy, messy and chaotic. She was damn rock star. She walked about in blood-soaked ballet flats, her beehive held high.
From Jagger, to Jimmi Hendrix, to Kurt Cobain, to Iggy Pop, to Lou Reed,  male stars  have used drugs, turned up on-stage drunk or high, got into fights, trashed hotel rooms, had ill-considered, public love-affairs, and made a great deal of chaos. Yet rarely has a female rock star indulged in this trend of chaotic living,  'messiness' of this sort has routinely spelt career death for any starlet! 
She was intelligent, self aware and a non conformist. She belted out her poetic lyrics with the strength and passion of a woman five times her size. Her lyrics were raw, honest and compelling. 'Rehab' ends with a confession that brings an unexpected, raw emotion to anyone who's ever tried to self-medicate for depression:
They said, I just think you’re depressedI said, yeah, baby, and the rest…It’s not just my prideIt’s just till these tears have dried.
She was emotionally anarchic, self-destructive and an unashamed. She had personal demons and issues and she was open, honest and public about them.
 Thinking any less of her because of her struggles, is simply an appalling disservice to not only Winehouse, but anyone who has lived/lives with addiction or mental health issues.
Sep 20, 2014 / 15,727 notes

celiajoydarling:

There is one thing that truly fills me with rage; when people refer to Amy Winehouse as “a train wreck”, “A bad role model” or worse “just a junkie”.

Yes, she was eccentric, she was bold, she used drugs, she was open about her eating disorders and her behavior was boozy, messy and chaotic. She was damn rock star. She walked about in blood-soaked ballet flats, her beehive held high.

From Jagger, to Jimmi Hendrix, to Kurt Cobain, to Iggy Pop, to Lou Reed,  male stars  have used drugs, turned up on-stage drunk or high, got into fights, trashed hotel rooms, had ill-considered, public love-affairs, and made a great deal of chaos. Yet rarely has a female rock star indulged in this trend of chaotic living,  'messiness' of this sort has routinely spelt career death for any starlet! 

She was intelligent, self aware and a non conformist. She belted out her poetic lyrics with the strength and passion of a woman five times her size. Her lyrics were raw, honest and compelling. 'Rehab' ends with a confession that brings an unexpected, raw emotion to anyone who's ever tried to self-medicate for depression:


They said, I just think you’re depressed
I said, yeah, baby, and the rest…
It’s not just my pride
It’s just till these tears have dried.

She was emotionally anarchic, self-destructive and an unashamed. She had personal demons and issues and she was open, honest and public about them.

Thinking any less of her because of her struggles, is simply an appalling disservice to not only Winehouse, but anyone who has lived/lives with addiction or mental health issues.

(via mysoulhasgrowndeep-liketherivers)

poeticlifephoto you’re welcome
Sep 20, 2014 / 78 notes

poeticlifephoto you’re welcome

(via selormq)

Sep 20, 2014 / 4,392 notes

fogo-av:

It’s that time of year again.
Just say no to racist costumes people.
Blackface is racist.
Dia de Los Muertos “costumes” are racist
Costuming off of someone else’s culture is racist.
Do your part in making this Halloween season enjoyable for everyone!

(via lati-negros)

Sep 20, 2014 / 6,774 notes

Anonymous said: white boys are so hot though

beyoncebeytwice:

so is lava before u realize u should actually stay really far away from it

Sep 20, 2014 / 149,096 notes

matureresponsibleadult:

thefatgawd:

leseanthomas:

studiocatch:

the-uncensored-she:

Mr. Rock reminding you of the white male dominated entertainment industry’s racist fuckery.

Word.

Good ‘ol Chris, lol.

Chris Rock to me STAYS WOKE and even though he play well with others he still keeps it real as fuck about race.

I hate white people who insult Chris Rock. “He’s so angry!” they say. Angry? He’s smiling ear to ear almost constantly! Maybe he seems angry to you because he’s pointing out things you’d rather not hear.

(via mysoulhasgrowndeep-liketherivers)

Sep 20, 2014 / 22,371 notes

snark0lepsy:

The Whitest Kids U’ Know x

(via mysoulhasgrowndeep-liketherivers)

Sep 20, 2014 / 17,538 notes
90skiddsolotoowild:

akiphotos:

Chenier & Kenneth

http://90skiddsolotoowild.tumblr.com/
Sep 20, 2014 / 38 notes
curvesincolor:

My literary intake as of late.
Sep 20, 2014 / 122 notes

curvesincolor:

My literary intake as of late.

Sep 20, 2014 / 11 notes

wispymagic said: Hi, How are you? I hope your day has been wonderful. I just wanted to say I think you're incredibly awesome and brave for speaking out against white people appropriating and using black culture while literally murdering black people especially on the internet (beware trolls!). Also I am really sorry that it takes bravery to speak up and that in 2014 you still have to deal with this shit. P.S I read that back and it sounded a bit condescending but I couldn't figure out how else to write it. Sorry

curvesincolor:

Thank you for the positive vibes and kind words. To share a bit about myself, my Grandmother was a Black Panther Supporter and a Civil Rights activist. The first book my Grandmother ever gave me to read was Black Boy by Richard Wright when I was 10 years old, she then went on to introduce me to the writings and thoughts of James Baldwin, Marcus Garvey, Angela Davis, and Malcolm X. 

I listened to Nina Simone, Bessie Smith, and Curtis Mayfield music as a child, my Grandmother was instilling within me the issues of being black in America and preparing me to speak intelligently about those issues for when I came of age.  

I’ve never been uncomfortable speaking the truth about the black experience in America, regardless of if my audience were a sea of black faces eager to learn something new or a obstreperous crowd of white people who were adverse to my education, my being, and what I had to say. 

There is no bravery here, and take no offense when I say that white people assign labels like “bravery” and “hero” to individuals who aren’t very deserving of these meritorious accomplishments. 

The objective of this blog is to promote the truth, and the truth is that we don’t need any more pejorative racist WHITE HEROES in America, we need more Leaders, Teachers, Philosophers, Inventors, Creators, Philanthropist, and Free Minded individuals who are people with dark skin and of diverse backgrounds-but all we have are WHITE HEROES who are racist capitalist in America.

P.S. All trolls are welcomed here, thank you again for reaching out with your kind thoughts. 

readcolor:

nayyirah waheed | u.s. | daughters of africa by margaret busby | english | anthology | ‘i was recently gifted with this anthology signed by the author/editor herself, the inscription reads ‘for nayyirah, a daughter of africa. may you be inspired.’ inspiration is beyond what i have received from this anthology. this work is a home. a house i walked into, and saw myself reflected everywhere. from time and through time. as a writer/artist of african descent, this compilation offered me a rest, recognition, pride, and joy, that overwhelmed. here is an excerpt from the book jacket, ‘…arranged chronologically, it charts a literary canon from the ancient egyptian queen hatshepsut and the queen of sheba, to popular contemporaries such as maya angelou, alice walker, and bauchi emecheta. it also includes many lesser known writers, and anonymous traditional works that exemplify the oral tradition handed down through generations. by placing side by side literature and orature from africa, the americas, the carribean and europe, new and exciting links are revealed as the common influences are traced and reclaimed for the first time. it brings together over two hundred women from across the globe- from antigua to zimbabwe, angola to the usa - to show the remarkable range of the african diaspora. and besides translations from african languages, includes work originally in dutch, french, german, portuguese, russian, spanish, and turkish. in addition to celebrating a unifying heritage, ‘daughters of africa’ testifies to the variety among these women, as demonstrated by the wealth of genres in which they express themselves: autobiography, memoirs, oral history, letters, diaries, short stories, novels (experimental, historical, science fiction) poetry, drama, humour, non-fiction (political, feminist, anthropological) journalism, speeches, essays, folklore. introduced by margaret busby and complete with biographical headnotes, annotation, and valuable extensive bibliographies, this unique chronicle of black women writers throughout the world charts their continuing literary contributions as never before.’ published in england, in 1992, ‘daughters of africa’ is a wide, sweeping, and intricate geography of writings by women of african descent through the ages. it is a critically important work and tenderly curated labor of love (a soul deep gratitude to margaret busby), which deserves a resurgence and should be a widely known reader and resource. in the home. in the educational sphere. in the world. this anthology celebrates and illuminates the reality that not only do women of african descent have a history, we are history.’ #ireadCOLORbecause it is a soft place to land. #readCOLOR #ireadCOLOR #writeCOLOR #iwriteCOLOR #daughtersofafrica #margaretbusby #books #literature #authorsofcolor #poc #diasporas #writers #readers #goodreads #instagood #tumblr #twitter #follow #summerreading #book #love #bookclub #literacy #global
Sep 20, 2014 / 1,424 notes

readcolor:

nayyirah waheed | u.s. | daughters of africa by margaret busby | english | anthology | ‘i was recently gifted with this anthology signed by the author/editor herself, the inscription reads ‘for nayyirah, a daughter of africa. may you be inspired.’ inspiration is beyond what i have received from this anthology. this work is a home. a house i walked into, and saw myself reflected everywhere. from time and through time. as a writer/artist of african descent, this compilation offered me a rest, recognition, pride, and joy, that overwhelmed. here is an excerpt from the book jacket, ‘…arranged chronologically, it charts a literary canon from the ancient egyptian queen hatshepsut and the queen of sheba, to popular contemporaries such as maya angelou, alice walker, and bauchi emecheta. it also includes many lesser known writers, and anonymous traditional works that exemplify the oral tradition handed down through generations. by placing side by side literature and orature from africa, the americas, the carribean and europe, new and exciting links are revealed as the common influences are traced and reclaimed for the first time. it brings together over two hundred women from across the globe- from antigua to zimbabwe, angola to the usa - to show the remarkable range of the african diaspora. and besides translations from african languages, includes work originally in dutch, french, german, portuguese, russian, spanish, and turkish. in addition to celebrating a unifying heritage, ‘daughters of africa’ testifies to the variety among these women, as demonstrated by the wealth of genres in which they express themselves: autobiography, memoirs, oral history, letters, diaries, short stories, novels (experimental, historical, science fiction) poetry, drama, humour, non-fiction (political, feminist, anthropological) journalism, speeches, essays, folklore. introduced by margaret busby and complete with biographical headnotes, annotation, and valuable extensive bibliographies, this unique chronicle of black women writers throughout the world charts their continuing literary contributions as never before.’ published in england, in 1992, ‘daughters of africa’ is a wide, sweeping, and intricate geography of writings by women of african descent through the ages. it is a critically important work and tenderly curated labor of love (a soul deep gratitude to margaret busby), which deserves a resurgence and should be a widely known reader and resource. in the home. in the educational sphere. in the world. this anthology celebrates and illuminates the reality that not only do women of african descent have a history, we are history.’ #ireadCOLORbecause it is a soft place to land. #readCOLOR #ireadCOLOR #writeCOLOR #iwriteCOLOR #daughtersofafrica #margaretbusby #books #literature #authorsofcolor #poc #diasporas #writers #readers #goodreads #instagood #tumblr #twitter #follow #summerreading #book #love #bookclub #literacy #global

(via curvesincolor)